Chennai Temple Tour Packages


Kabaleeswarar Temple

Kapaleashwarar Temple is located in Mylapore, Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Nayanmars sing hymns in this temple. According to the Puranas, Shakthi worshipped Shiva, in the form of the Peacock, which is why the name Mylai was given to the area that developed around the temple, as ‘Mayil’ means Peacock in Tamil.The Pallavas kings built the temple around 7CE. The pallava Nayanamars built this temple.
The presiding God of this temple is a form of Shiva called Kapaleashwarar. The form of Shiva’s wife Parvati at this temple is called Karpagambal (from the Tamil for “goddess of the wish-yielding tree”). Puranas have it that Lord Shiva was once telling Lord Brahma, the Hindu god of creation, about the creation of the three lokas but Lord Brahma did not agree with what Shiva said. Shiva got angry and plucked out one of Brahma’s four heads. Brahma begged for forgiveness and was asked to perform penance at Mayilai (Mylapore) and then he asked Lord Shiva to take the name of Kapaleashwarar as Lord Shiva (eswarar) was wearing a necklace of skulls (kapala).

 

Vadapalani Murugan Temple

Built about 125 years back, this much-hallowed and regularly frequented Lord Muruga sannidhi has emerged from a thatched shed, an unostentatious one enshrining a Murugan picture only, and established for itself a name on par with ancient places of worship. There are very many sannidhis in the vast courtyards of the temple, like Varasiddhi Vinayaka, Chokkanathar, Meenakshi Amman, Kali, Bhairava, Shanmuga with Valli and Devasena, et al.

The moolavar in standing posture resembles the Palani Muruga in every respect. In the inner prakara, there are many niches housing Dakshina Murti, Chandikeswar, Mahalakshmi, et al. The entrance to this temple is crowned with a rajagopuram adorned with several stucco images depicting legends from the Skanda puranam.The eastern tower rises to a height of 40.8 metres. The 108 bharata natyam dance gestures can be seen on the eastern tower as well

 

Marundeeswarar Temple

Lord Marundeeswarar is known so because he taught sage Agastya about some magical medicine. Since then The Marundeeswarar temple has been a place of worship for people with diseases and various problems with their health. It is said that even The Sage Valmiki, who wrote The Ramayana, came here to The Marundeeswarar temple to worship The Lord. Sage Valmiki was said to be blessed here.
The temple has smaller Shrines for Lord Ganesha, Lord Murugan, Lord Shiva, which has the idols of Lord Shiva in his three forms, Lord Theyagaraja, Lord Marundeeswarar, and Lord Nataraja. Lord Nataraja is supposed to be Lord Shiva in his dancing form. Marundeeswarar temple belongs to the Chola period and occupies an area of about 1 acre. The temple is believed to be built somewhere in the 7th century A.D.Tirugnanasambandar and Tirunavukkarasar the Saint Saivite Poets have visited and sung the praises of this temple, testifying its existence during their life time – about a 1200 years ago.

 

Parthasarathy Temple

The Parthasarathy Temple is an 8th century Hindu Vaishnavite temple dedicated to Lord Krishna.It is one among the 108 divyadesams or holy abodes of Lord Vishnu. The name ‘Parthasarathy’, in Sanskrit, means the ‘charioteer of Arjuna’, and Lord Krishna is worshipped in that role in this temple. It was originally built by the Pallavas in the 8th century by king Narasimhavarman I. One of the distinguishing features of is that it has four of the incarnations or avatars of Vishnu: Narasimha, Rama, Varaha and Krishna.
There are shrines for Sri Vedhavalli Thayaar, Sri Ranganatha, Sri Rama, Sri Gajendra Varadharaja Swamy, Narasimha, Sri Andal, Sri Anjaneya, Alwars, Ramanuja, Swami Manavala Mamunigal and Vedanthachariar. There are separate entrances for Lord Parthasarathy and Lord Narasimha. Lord Krishna was the charioteer for Arjuna during the Mahabharata war when he gave the Hindu holy book of Bhagavad Gita. Hence, the God, Sri Parthasarathy’s face is full of scars created by the arrows of the Great Bhishma in the Kurukshetra war.

 

Santhome Basilica

San Thome Basilica is a Roman Catholic minor basilica in Santhome. It was built in the 16th century by Portuguese explorers, and rebuilt again with the status of a cathedral by the British in 1893. The British version still stands today. It was designed in Neo-Gothic style, favoured by British architects in the late 19th century. San Thome Basilica is the principal church of the Madras-Mylapore Catholic Archdiocese. In 1956, Pope Pius XII raised the church to the status of a Minor Basilica, and on February 11, 2006, it was declared a national shrine by the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India.
This lovely Gothic Church is an architectural treasure. Rising 155 feet from the ground, with a nave of 112 feet by 33 feet, and an imposing sanctuary 62 feet long and 33 feet wide, it is adorned with stained glass windows depicting St. Thomas and the other Apostles. Inside the sanctuary is a statue of St. Thomas seated. A valuable work of art kept in the Basilica is an ancient painting of Our Blessed Mother, in front of which the other great apostle of India, St. Francis Xavier, used to pray.